Posted in Book reviews

Before You Let The Sun In*

Okay firstly I want to apologise to both Natalie at The Book Publicist, and Ian Robertson and Katerina Couroucli-Robertson (the authors) for the delay in getting this post up.  I seem to have had a few computer issues over the last week or so, and as such this post (which should have gone live last week) is only going live now. So my sincere apologies. It would appear that any time I schedule the post, it doesn’t work. So here we are at half ten at night rewriting it and forcing it live. Sorry!

Rox and Natalie both reached out to me regarding the blogger tour for Before You Let The Sun In, and to be honest I was intrigued. It sounded like such a different concept for a book, and, wanting to try something a little different, I said yes.

Before You Let The Sun In consists of 10 case histories that cover a wide range of themes from obesity to depression. The dramatherapist writes in the first person to describe her reactions and interactions with her clients, as well as some of the techniques used in the therapeutic process.  Although life doesn’t always follow the “beginning, middle and end” formation that we are used to with stories, these real cases have been modified slightly to allow it to conform to the story-telling genre.

Starting with a woman struggling with her weight, Before You Let The Sun In leaves you reading each story and relating in one way or another to the patient (client? Patient doesn’t seem right…) as they undergo their therapy sessions. From an overweight woman realising her relationship with food stems back to childhood issues, to a young boy trying to “find himself” and assert his own personality, I found myself not wanting to put Before You Let The Sun In down, yet also wanting to stop and absorb everything I’d just read.

Before You Let The Sun In gets its title from a quote by Dylan Thomas. During one of the earlier chapters, a client’s progression through therapy reminds our therapist of the below quote.

Before you let the sun in, mind he wipes his shoes.

Personally, having never heard of this quote before, I did find myself thinking in depth about what this actually means, and how we choose to let the sun in.

About the Authors:

Ian Robertson is a graduate of Trinity College Dublin, where he studied French and Spanish Language and Literature, and holds an MA in Creative Writing from Lancaster University. He lives in Greece, where he works as a teacher, actor, translator and writer. He has written a number of English Language Teaching books as well as novels, short stories and poems.

Dr Katerina Couroucli-Robertson was born in England and brought up in Greece by her English mother and Greek father. She is a psychotherapist with a PhD in Dramatherapy from Surrey University. She is also a teacher in special education, Head of Studies at the Herma Institute of Dramatherapy and Playtherapy, and an external lecturer at the University of Thessaly. She is the director of a theatre group for V.S.A. Hellas (Very Special Arts) made up of people with and without learning difficulties, and has published numerous articles on Dramatherapy.

To be honest, overall I found Before You Let The Sun In to be an intriguing read. Brilliant. But intriguing more than anything else. When discussing what I was reading with family members and colleagues at work, I found myself struggling to explain what it is I enjoyed so much about it, other than it was an interesting insight into peoples’ lives, and the way even the smallest of thing can affect us. Am I making sense? I’m not sure.

All I can say is that I think everyone should at least try and read Before You Let The Sun In. If only to see which case they feel they can most relate to (if any!).

For my first attempt at non-fiction in quite a while, I would honestly say that while I wouldn’t necessarily have picked Before You Let The Sun In up in my local book store, it is one of those ones I would see in an airport and think “you know, this could make an interesting holiday read”, even though it isn’t the lightest of books to read. You can get your hands on a copy here.

Have you read Before You Let The Sun In? Or do you think it’s the sort of book you would like to read? As always, please do leave your thoughts down below!

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Author:

Hey :) I'm 21, from Northern Ireland and Glasgow and no longer new to blogging. I love all things TV, books, food, music and film as well as going out with friends. This is hopefully somewhere you'll be able to come if you feel you need a laugh or even just to stay in touch. I'd like to take this chance to say thanks for coming to read! Enjoy and feel free to make any recommendations!

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